Surveys

Four important surveys for music education launch

These three surveys focus on three areas of music education: the first focuses on primary school music; the second focuses current situation in secondary schools and the third is an ISM members’ consultation on the National Plan for Music Education.

In addition, the Durham Commission, a joint Arts Council England and Durham University research programme, is asking for views on creativity.

We want to hear from you - respond today!

More information on each survey

Complete this if you are involved in curriculum music at primary level.

Closes in September 2018.

Primary music is vital but there is very little information about the level of music education currently being delivered within our primary schools.

Following feedback from music teachers, the ISM is working with Kevin Rogers, an experienced music inspector, to assess if National Curriculum music is being delivered effectively across all years in the Primary phase; and if its provision is being challenged by current accountability / budgetary pressures.

Kevin said:

‘There is a wealth of data regarding music in secondary schools, but with precious little data collected on the delivery of the National Curriculum within primary schools, I would encourage music teachers in primary schools to respond to this survey and tell us what is going in their school.’

Closes in September 2018.

Run by the University of Sussex, supported by the ISM, this is for secondary music teachers in state and independent schools.

This important survey of secondary music is being run by Dr Ally Daubney and Duncan Mackrill from the University of Sussex. It builds on their independent study which reported back in March 2017.

Dr Ally Daubney said:

‘This is the only survey of its kind. Building on our audit of secondary music provision from 2012 to 2016/17, we are inviting secondary music teachers to show what is going on in schools across England 2016 to 2018/19, allowing us to see into the future in terms of uptake and to map changes across a 7-year period. The findings of our previous survey were widely reported over the last year in the press, television, radio and led to a number of questions being tabled in Parliament. This is your chance to help us make the case with politicians and the Department for Education for music in the curriculum.’

Duncan Mackrill added:

‘Our survey in 2016 uncovered some deeply concerning trends in music in our secondary schools. This is an opportunity to follow-up on this important work and take stock of the state of music education in our secondary schools, mapping changes from 2012 to 2018/19. I strongly encourage secondary music teachers to respond so that together we can demonstrate changes in terms of curriculum time and models, staffing levels and uptake across Key Stages 3 to 5.

Closes at the end of July 2018.

Complete this if you are involved in curriculum music at primary level.

Primary music is vital but there is very little information about the level of music education currently being delivered within our primary schools.

Following feedback from music teachers, the ISM is working with Kevin Rogers, an experienced music inspector, to assess if National Curriculum music is being delivered effectively across all years in the Primary phase; and if its provision is being challenged by current accountability / budgetary pressures.

Kevin said ‘There is a wealth of data regarding music in secondary schools, but with precious little data collected on the delivery of the National Curriculum within primary schools, I would encourage music teachers in primary schools to respond to this survey and tell us what is going in their school.’

Closes at the end of July 2018.

The Durham Commission on Creativity and Education is asking people about the role creative thinking and creativity play in their lives.

The short questionnaire – open until the end of July 2018 - asks people among other things to ‘share what helps and limits them to be creative, whether creativity is valued, and what creativity means to them.’

The commission is an important collaboration between Arts Council England and Durham University, so please do take a moment to share your views with them if you can.