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Musician Letter

{Your MP name}

{Constitency Address}

Dear {Your MP name}

I am writing to you as my local MP because I am extremely concerned about the survival of the music sector following the simultaneously devastating effects of COVID-19 and a hard Brexit this December.

As a musician, I am very proud of my industry, which generates £5.2bn to the economy each year and almost 200,000 jobs. Although highly skilled, musicians are not highly paid workers. As there is not enough work available in the UK, many musicians like me rely heavily on work in the European Union – whether that involves performing, recording, teaching, collaborating or other activities. In this time of great uncertainty, musicians need to know that their livelihoods will be protected.

The latest report from the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM), the UK’s professional body for musicians, which founded the Save Music campaign, reveals the damage that Brexit has already caused to the music sector. This important study demonstrates that over half the music workforce have experienced a negative impact on their professional work because of Brexit, reflecting a year-on-year increase since the 2016 European Referendum. This research also shows that musicians have lost substantial amounts of work and earnings due to Brexit and their biggest concern is securing future work in the European Union after the transition period.

The report’s findings, coupled with the impact of COVID-19, demonstrate a sector at a crossroads, in clear need of support from the Government to guarantee its survival. The outbreak of COVID-19 has had disastrous consequences for the music sector with cancellations, closures and the loss of work and livelihoods virtually overnight.

The Government’s plans to negotiate free trade agreements with different parts of the world, including the EU, have been stopped in their tracks by the global Coronavirus pandemic. Going straight from COVID-19 to the end of the transition period without ensuring enough time to negotiate new trading agreements will be devastating for the music profession and the wider music and creative industries. Therefore, to avoid irreversible damage, the Government must recover some of the time lost to Covid-19 that would have been spent negotiating our future relationship with the EU by requesting an extension to the transition period.

To allows musicians to tour easily the ISM is also calling for the Government to introduce:


- a two-year, multi-entry touring visa;

- a cultural exemption for the temporary transportation of instruments and equipment; and

- an expansion of the list of CITES-designated points of entry and exit.

The music sector will also need careful rebuilding given the requirement to continue social distancing so that musicians can work again in a post-Covid-19, post-Brexit world. The music sector is facing the reality that until mass gatherings are reintroduced, which is likely to be the last stage of lockdown easing, the music sector cannot return to work. Other European countries such as Germany and Estonia have provided substantial financial packages for the creative industries, and a financial package at EU level is currently being discussed in the European Parliament; we call on the UK Government to do the same.

As my local MP, please can you raise these issues with Government to protects musicians and their livelihoods during this crisis.

Yours sincerely

{Your name}

Click here to copy the text

Non-musician letter

{Your MP name}

{Constitency Address}


Dear {Your MP name}

I am writing to you as my local MP because I am extremely concerned about the survival of the music sector following the simultaneously devastating effects of COVID-19 and a hard Brexit this December.

The music industry generates £5.2bn to the economy each year and almost 200,000 jobs. Although highly skilled, musicians are not highly paid workers. As there is not enough work available in the UK, many musicians like me rely heavily on work in the European Union – whether that involves performing, recording, teaching, collaborating or other activities. In this time of great uncertainty, musicians need to know that their livelihoods will be protected.

The latest report from the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM), the UK’s professional body for musicians, which founded the Save Music campaign, reveals the damage that Brexit has already caused to the music sector. This important study demonstrates that over half the music workforce have experienced a negative impact on their professional work because of Brexit, reflecting a year-on-year increase since the 2016 European Referendum. This research also shows that musicians have lost substantial amounts of work and earnings due to Brexit and their biggest concern is securing future work in the European Union after the transition period.

The report’s findings, coupled with the impact of COVID-19, demonstrate a sector at a crossroads, in clear need of support from the Government to guarantee its survival. The outbreak of COVID-19 has had disastrous consequences for the music sector with cancellations, closures and the loss of work and livelihoods virtually overnight.

The Government’s plans to negotiate free trade agreements with different parts of the world, including the EU, have been stopped in their tracks by the global Coronavirus pandemic. Going straight from COVID-19 to the end of the transition period without ensuring enough time to negotiate new trading agreements will be devastating for the music profession and the wider music and creative industries. Therefore, to avoid irreversible damage, the Government must recover some of the time lost to Covid-19 that would have been spent negotiating our future relationship with the EU by requesting an extension to the transition period.

To allows musicians to tour easily the ISM is also calling for the Government to introduce:


- a two-year, multi-entry touring visa;

- a cultural exemption for the temporary transportation of instruments and equipment; and

- an expansion of the list of CITES-designated points of entry and exit.

The music sector will also need careful rebuilding given the requirement to continue social distancing so that musicians can work again in a post-Covid-19, post-Brexit world. The music sector is facing the reality that until mass gatherings are reintroduced, which is likely to be the last stage of lockdown easing, the music sector cannot return to work. Other European countries such as Germany and Estonia have provided substantial financial packages for the creative industries, and a financial package at EU level is currently being discussed in the European Parliament; we call on the UK Government to do the same.

As my local MP, please can you raise these issues with Government to protects musicians and their livelihoods during this crisis.

Yours sincerely

{Your name}

Click here to copy the text