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Musician Letter

{Your MP name}
{Constitency Address}

Dear {Your MP name}

As a musician and one of your constituents, I am writing to you because I am extremely concerned about the impact Brexit may have on my ability to work in the EU following the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

The latest report from the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM), the UK’s professional body for musicians, which founded the Save Music campaign, shows that the continued confusion over Brexit is already causing real damage to the music profession.

UK musicians like me rely heavily on the right of free movement within the EU27/EEA in order to be able to perform there. For many musicians, a substantial part of their earnings comes from performing in the EU27/EEA. 85% of respondents to ISM research visit the EU27/EEA for work at least once a year, 22% visit the EU27/EEA more than 11 times per year, 35% spend at least a month per year working in EU27/EEA countries, and one in seven musicians have less than a week’s notice between being offered work and having to take it. The introduction of the ISM's ask for a two-year, multi-entry, cheap and admin-light, touring visa is essential.

Any arrangements with the EU following the transition period will also need to cover the movement of goods (musical instruments and sound equipment) as we need to be able to travel with our instruments; health insurance or an alternative to the EHIC scheme as private healthcare will be expensive; and the proposed cost of Musical Instrument Certificates, which are only required for instruments containing endangered species according to CITES (including ivory, Brazilian rosewood, tortoiseshell), International Driving Permits, and tax arrangements so we do not become liable for double deductions of social security payments in other EU countries. Most gigging/freelance musicians like me earn on average around £20,000 per year and simply cannot afford an extra costs.

It is essential that a deal is agreed with the EU in which the following is covered:

1. The introduction of a two-year, multi-entry touring visa, that is cheap and admin-light.
2. The continuation of the A1 certificate system, or an equivalent established, to ensure that musicians are not liable for additional social security payments in EU27 countries.
3. The introduction of a simple, cheap and fit-for-purpose customs mechanism that will ensure musicians can temporarily transport instruments and sound equipment when touring.
4. An expansion of the current list of CITES-designated ports to include further ports serving Scotland, at least one serving the north of England, and Eurostar. This will ensure that musicians are able to easily transport their instruments to the EU27.


It's essential that following the end of the transition period the UK has a comprehensive arrangement with the EU that protects musicians and their livelihoods post-Brexit. At the moment there seems to be a huge number of obstacles in the path of our music community which will severely damage not just our livelihoods but also the music sector. I am asking you to pledge to ensuring that the music sector and musicians are protected and ask ministerial colleagues about the issues detailed above.

Yours sincerely

{Your name}

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Non-musician letter

{Your MP name}

{Constitency Address}

Dear {Your MP name}

As one of your constituents, I am writing to you because I am extremely concerned about the impact Brexit may have on the ability of musicians to work in the EU following the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

The latest report from the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM), the UK’s professional body for musicians, which founded the Save Music campaign, shows that the uncertainty over Brexit is already causing real damage to the music profession.

UK musicians rely heavily on the right of free movement within the EU27/EEA in order to be able to perform there. For many musicians, a substantial part of their earnings comes from performing in the EU27/EEA. 85% of respondents to ISM research visit the EU27/EEA for work at least once a year, 22% visit the EU27/EEA more than 11 times per year, 35% spend at least a month per year working in EU27/EEA countries, and one in seven musicians have less than a week’s notice between being offered work and having to take it. The introduction of the ISM's ask for a two-year, multi-entry, cheap and admin-light, touring visa is essential.

Any arrangements following the transition period with the EU will also need to cover the movement of goods (musical instruments and sound equipment) as musicians need to be able to travel with our instruments; health insurance or an alternative to the EHIC scheme as private healthcare will be expensive; and the proposed cost of Musical Instrument Certificates, which are only required for instruments containing endangered species according to CITES (including ivory, Brazilian rosewood, tortoiseshell), International Driving Permits, and tax arrangements so musicians do not become liable for double deductions of social security payments in other EU countries. Most gigging/freelance musicians earn on average around £20,000 per year and simply cannot afford any extra costs.

It's essential that following the end of the transition period the UK has a comprehensive arrangement with the EU that protects musicians and their livelihoods post-Brexit. At the moment there seems to be a huge number of obstacles in the path of the music community which will severely damage not just our livelihoods but also the music sector. I am asking you to pledge to ensuring that the music sector and musicians are protected and ask ministerial colleagues about the issues detailed above.

Yours sincerely


{Your name}

Click here to copy the text