COVID-19 and its impact on gender, race and disability

'Being someone who is quite a rarity in the classical industry, being a young black female, it suddenly became apparent that I was the only one. My life's dedication is to ensure that this changes, and for me this lies in access to high quality music education.

- Mahaliah Edwards

An expert panel discusses whether existing inequalities in the music sector have been exacerbated or brought to light by COVID-19. How can we widen access to creative careers and work together to create a more diverse and inclusive industry?

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Speakers

Vick Bain (Chair)
Music industry consultant

Vick is a music industry consultant and campaigner for diversity and inclusion in the music industry. She was CEO of BASCA (the Ivors Academy) and is currently the interim Director of Strategy at Attitude is Everything. Vick is the author of ‘Counting the Music Industry’, a report on gender in the music industry, the curator of The F-List directory of female musicians, and a PhD researcher at Queen Mary University.

Mary-Alice Stack
CEO Creative United

Mary-Alice is Chief Executive of Creative United, and has led on the development and launch of the Take it away scheme, an initiative designed to enable more people to get involved in learning and playing a musical instrument. Her work in the music sector has focused primarily on addressing the barriers faced by disabled people of all ages in accessing music education and professional development opportunities.

Keith Harris OBE

Keith has been in the music industry for more than 45 years. He has worked both in the UK, where he was Head of Promotions and then General Manager of Motown Records at EMI, and the US where he was Operations Manager for Stevie Wonder. He was Chairman of the Music Managers Forum, and also Chaired the Equality and Diversity Taskforce for UK Music.

Mahaliah Edwards
Performer, educator


Mahaliah is a violinist, educator and workshop facilitator based in Nottingham. She has a versatile performing portfolio as well as a successful career as an educator, community music facilitator and advocate for music for social change. She is passionate about working with young people and developing essential skills through engaging with music and the arts.

Mark Taylor
Senior Lecturer


Mark is Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Methods (Sociology) at the Sheffield Methods Institute, University of Sheffield, and is AHRC Leadership Fellow (Creative Economy) until 2021. His research interests are in inequalities in culture, in both audiences and work. He’s also interested in quantitative methods, particularly data visualisation. He is the co-author of Culture Is Bad For You: Inequality in the cultural and creative industries.