Music hubs: what you need to know Jump to main content

Music hubs: what you need to know

Introduction:

1. What are the essentials?
2. What is the ISM?
3. What are the new Music Education Hubs?
4. Why does this matter to you?

Essentials:

5. You’ll need a CRB check
6. Good news: Changes to the CRB system in 2013
7. What is your employment status?
8. What fees are charged by other music teachers?
9. Make sure you are insured
10. Looking for more work? Contact your music education hub or local schools

Being a good music teacher:

11. I have heard about a new qualification for music teachers. Is this true?
12. Professional Development
13. Ofsted has some really helpful guidance for music teachers

Other useful information:

14. What is the relationship framework?
15. One last thing: Tell people about the importance of music

Introduction

1. What are the essentials?
This guide has been put together to help freelance musicians, peripatetic music teachers and classroom music teachers understand the key changes within the music education sector, and to offer practical advice and guidance for those involved in music education at this time of unprecedented change in the structure of music education in England.

2. What is the ISM?
The Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM) is the UK’s professional body for musicians, providing a distinctive range of services to its membership which includes music teachers, performers, composers and industry professionals. The Incorporated Society of Musicians aims to promote the art of music and champion the interests of musicians, raising professional standards, and providing legal advice and other benefits to its members.

3. What are the new music education hubs?
In September 2012, new music education hubs came into operation, created by Arts Council England and the Department for Education. The hubs are in place to deliver the National Plan for Music Education in England. This important change has been based on the work of Darren Henley in his Review of Music Education in England and the Government’s response. The hubs cover one or more local authority area and the overwhelming majority are led by a local music service.

4. Why does this matter to you?
There are a lot of changes going on in music education and in education more generally which means that more responsibility could be placed on you if you are a music teacher, senior leader or other music professional. It could also be that employers, such as music services, academies and free schools, are looking for ways to save money and it is important that you are aware of the law. National funding for hubs will decline from £73 million to £58 million over the two and a half years. The ISM is fighting to ensure that funding continues.

Don’t forget! The ISM provides a 24 hour tax and legal helpline, one-to-one legal advice on anything from contracts to employment and self-employment issues as well as insurances and professional advice.

Essentials:

5. You’ll need a CRB check
Teaching is a regulated activity and it is an Ofsted requirement for schools to obtain CRB Enhanced Disclosures on their teaching staff. You can find out more about CRB checks by visiting the Directgov website.

If you are an ISM member and are a self-employed musician or music teacher who regularly works with children, or you teach privately, you can obtain a CRB Enhanced Disclosure through the ISM. This can be done as part of an application for ISM Registered Private Teacher status or separately. We recommend that you obtain a CRB Enhanced Disclosure through us every three years. For further information please contact our Membership Officer, [email protected]

6. Good news: Changes to the CRB system in 2013. In 2013 the CRB check system will be overhauled so that music teachers won’t need multiple checks to work for more than one institution. This is in part thanks to the campaigning of the ISM. The Home Office has provided some further guidance about these changes.

7. What is your employment status? For guidance on whether you are employed or self-employed, go to https://www.ism.org/members/article/employed_self-employed. There we highlight the main advantages of both employed and self-employed status. Remember that even if a music hub engages you on a freelance basis, you may still fall into the category of 'worker' and so have a number of statutory rights under the Working Time Regulations, including the right to paid holiday.

8. What fees are charged by other music teachers? We publish the results of our latest survey of fees charged by self-employed music teachers in schools and recommended rates for employed music teachers in schools.

9. Make sure you are insured: There is a summary of the essential insurances we offer our members on our website. As part of our membership package which includes legal insurances such as public liability and employers' liability, we have just started to offer our members access to professional indemnity insurance from just £58 as we have found that increasingly contractors are asking freelance teachers to provide this.

10. Looking for more work? Contact your music education hub or local schools:
Your local music education hub, usually led by the local music service, may be looking for experienced professional teachers. To find you local music education hub, Arts Council England have produced a list of hubs by local authority area.

In addition, as more and more schools become academies and free schools, you will be able to work directly for schools. You can find your local schools using a search function available on the Directgov website.

Being a good music teacher:

It is important to keep yourself engaged in professional development and remain on the look out to improve the excellent and professional work you already do. Here we answer some questions about professional development reforms and the professional development opportunities provided by the ISM.

11. I have heard about a new qualification for music teachers. Is this true?
The Government plans to introduce a new qualification for music educators called the Qualified Music Educator or QME qualification. It will potentially be useful for professional development but what it will not be is teacher training and it will not be mandatory or a ‘licence to practise.’ More information can be found on the blog by ISM President-Elect Richard Hallam who has been attending steering group meetings.

The Government has also piloted some new Initial Teacher Training (ITT) modules for primary classroom teachers which may be made available as professional development opportunities for primary teachers as well.

12. The ISM is dedicated to helping our members develop their skills as music professionals and we will be offering a variety of seminars and talks in 2013 which cover anything from pedagogy to employment status and legal advice. Our professional development events will be published shortly before the new year. Visit the Training and careers section of our website for a list of our current professional development events.

13. Ofsted has some really helpful guidance for music teachers
Ofsted sees a lot of music education in action and recently published its review of music education. In their review they found that music needed to be used more in music lessons to assess and teach. As it was a 73 page report, the ISM has produced, in partnership with Dr Alison Daubney from the University of Sussex, a helpful one page summary for head teachers and senior leaders and a three page summary for music educators.

In addition to this, Ofsted have helpfully published a report on partnerships in music education stressing the importance of getting head teachers to back partnerships. A briefing will soon be published on the ISM website.

Other useful information

14. What is the relationship framework?
To formalise the relationship between the Department for Education and the music education hubs, Arts Council England (ACE) have produced a relationship framework which sets out what sort of work your local music education hub should be delivering.

15. One last thing: Tell people about the importance of music
Music education gets a unique stream of funding from the Department for Education to augment and support the music education that should already be going on in schools.


We must never stop reminding people just how valuable music is; valuable in itself, publicly popular, economically critical and hugely beneficial to children.

To keep up with our latest campaigns check ism.org or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin.

You can download this guide by clicking on the link below.