Fees for employed visiting music teachers in schools: Our survey results 2020

Hourly rates for employed music teachers in schools by school type (£ per hour)

Alongside our other teaching and examining surveys, we have now published our survey results for the academic year 2019/20 fees for employed visiting music teachers in schools. These are set out in the table below. They are exclusive of holiday pay, which schools should pay in addition.

Type of School£ per hour£ per hour
Mid-point*Central-range**
Independent schools£33.96£28.75-39.55
State funded schools (inc academies and free schools)£28£25-31
Music services or hubs£25£21-29
Specialist music schools£34£30-37
Overall£30£24 - 35

* Half the respondents charged this amount or more and half charged this amount or less.
** Most respondents charged fees within this range. (Only 20% charged more and 20% charged less.)

Hourly rates for employed music teachers in schools by region (£ per hour)


Region£ per hour£ per hour
Mid-point*Central-range**
Inner London£30£26.09-£42
Outer London£30.16£26-39.28
Elsewhere in the UK£29.50£24-34.25
Overall£30£24-35

* Half the respondents charged this amount or more and half charged this amount or less.

** Most respondents charged fees within this range. (Only 20% charged more and 20% charged less.)

There is no significant difference in the hourly rates between those working for state-funded schools and music services. There is also no significant difference in the hourly rates between those working for independent schools and those working for specialist music schools. However, there are significant differences between independent schools and both state-funded school and music services and between specialist music schools and the same two school types.

Across all types of school and all regions the average hourly rate was £30.06. The lowest hourly rate recorded was £10.23, this was for teaching in a music hub in South-East England. The maximum hourly rate quoted by two respondents was £60; one was for teaching in the Scottish Music Initiative while the other was for teaching in a state-funded school in the West Midlands.

Twenty per cent of respondents were paid £24 or less per hour, while 20% were paid £35 or more. The median was £30 per hour. These rates are similar to last year. These rates are very similar to last year with some data points increasing slightly, while others decreased slightly.

If we combine the groups outside of London giving the same regional grouping as used in previous years, we now find a significant difference between the hourly rate for employed music teachers in London (both Inner and Outer) and the rest of the country.

Holiday pay: Is holiday entitlement pro-rated based on the amount of work during the school year

FrequencyPercentage
Yes12438.6%
No10231.8%
Don't know9529.6%
Total321100

Less than 40% of respondents said their holiday entitlement was pro-rated based on the amount of work during the school year, but almost 30% didn’t know.

Children taught

Respondents were asked how many children they taught as an employed teacher. Responses ranged from just one or two all the way up to 600. The majority though taught between 10 and 60 children. The 20% point was 10 children, the 80% point was 60 children and the median value was 25 children.

A Subject Association For Music